Painted Tee

Painted Tee

The Hero says I have a problem with leaving things the way they are. Maybe. Or maybe I see a plain tee as a blank slate waiting to be turned into a new masterpiece. I like my way of thinking best.

The inspiration for my painted tee came from a variety of places. My IG stream is full of natural hair chicks wearing cool t-shirts. Last year’s (probably this year for us fashion backward types) graphic sweater inspiration photos are still in my Evernote queue (I’m that far behind on projects). And, to just keep it real, I got tired of this plain old long-sleeved tee. It was either painting or rag. I figured painting would save me from a heated discussion with The Hero about my style choices.

I used the last of my fabric paint additive on this project and am glad I did. I also created a custom stencil for it from a royalty-free clip art I found online (don’t want to get in trouble with copyright infringement). If you don’t have the supplies to make your own stencil on hand, wing it. I’ve made stencils from manilla folders, cereal boxes and the backs of notebooks.

You’ll need a good sturdy surface for painting. Since it was already set up, I used my ironing board. I mean… who’s REALLY concerned about wrinkles on the weekend?

Painted Tee

Supplies

  • solid colored tee (long- or short-sleeved)
  • stencil
  • tape
  • acrylic paint
  • fabric paint additive
  • foam pouncer or stencil brush
  • wax paper
  • fine glitter (optional)

Wash and dry your tee. Iron it to get out any remaining wrinkles.

Put the wax paper inside the shirt. It will protect the paint from bleeding through and ruining your shirt. Tape the stencil to your shirt.

Mix the acrylic paint (2 parts) and fabric additive (1 part). Add the glitter if you’re using it. Mix more than you need. You’ll need more than one coat for even coverage and you’ll be glad you mixed it all at once.

Arrange the stencil on the shirt where you want the image to lie. Tape the stencil to the shirt.

Lightly dab the paint on the stencil. Let the first coat dry and repeat with remaining coats until you reach the desired coverage. Allow the shirt to dry for at least 24 hours.

To wash: Turn the shirt inside out and wash on delicate. Hang or lay flat to dry.

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2 Comments

  1. I love it I never thought of putting the glitter in the fabric additive great idea and you’ve just solved a problem for me for a project I have in mind 🙂 wrinkles on the weekend, truthfully I don’t care about them in weekdays lol, thanks for linking at freaking awesome Fridays I hope you come back this week 🙂

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